Wood you believe it! Łódź reveals stunning plans for hotel made from WOOD

The seven-storey, 52-room Breath-In Hotel aims to mimic the dimensions and silhouettes of the town’s historic architecture whilst harnessing the latest eco-minded technology and solutions. Press materials

A Łódź-based architectural practice have made waves in the design world after unveiling stunning plans for a city centre hotel made from wood.

Occupying an empty plot on the corner of Narutowicza and Sienkiewicza in Łódź, the project envisions the creation of a seven-storey, 52-room hotel that will harness the latest eco-minded technology and solutions.

Touting a total floor area of 3,340 sq/m, the project will also feature co-working space, events facilities, a restaurant, bar and spa.Press materials

Created by MAKAA, the hotel has been inspired by the city’s heritage.

“It’s a sincere reference to the original wooden tenements once found in the city and the creaking wooden steps still found in many,” says Marcin Waloryszak, co-founder of the studio.

Offering an inventive reimagining of the traditional corner buildings found in Poland’s third city, the Breath-In Hotel aims to mimic the dimensions and silhouettes of the town’s historic architecture whilst updating the style in a manner in line with the aesthetics of modular functionalism.

Following the principle of “less is more”, the building courts attention while simultaneously merging into the fabric of the city.Press materials

Touting a total floor area of 3,340 sq/m, the project will also feature co-working space, events facilities, a restaurant, bar and spa.

Commissioned last year by an undisclosed investor, plans for the Breath-In have only just been made public. Already, though, the response has been enthusiastic, not least on account of its non-standard exterior and various innovations.

Most notable of all will be the use of CLT technology (Cross Laminated Timber), a material four times lighter than concrete and less environmentally harmful than more normal building materials.

Commissioned last year by an undisclosed investor, plans for the Breath-In have only just been made public. Already, though, the response has been enthusiastic, not least on account of its non-standard exterior and various innovations.Press materials

Allowing for quick construction time, CLT also boasts a low carbon footprint and can easily be re-used or biodegraded.

“Not only does CLT have a high fire resistance but it is also the highest-rated building material when thinking in terms of a responsible, circular economy,” says Katarzyna Waloryszak, co-partner at MAKAA.

“It’s renewable, recyclable and easy to reuse,” she adds. “Construction using CLT goes faster and is cleaner and, above all, low-emission.”

Most notable of all will be the use of CLT technology (Cross Laminated Timber), a material four times lighter than concrete and less environmentally harmful than more normal building materials.Press materials

Other eco considerations have also been made, among them the inclusion of innovations relating to solar energy, water retention and natural cooling – the installation of vertical wooden shutters, for instance, will protect the structure from overheating.

“We wanted this project to maximize self-sufficiency and to express the concept of sustainable development,” says Marcin Waloryszak.

“Demonstrating sensitivity to the environment and our human needs marks a return to the simplest assumptions of architecture.”

Other eco considerations have also been made, among them the inclusion of innovations relating to solar energy, water retention and natural cooling – the installation of vertical wooden shutters, for instance, will protect the structure from overheating.Press materials

But whilst these eco credentials have already won a raft of admirers, so too has the hotel’s fundamental style. Following the principle of “less is more”, the building courts attention while simultaneously merging into the fabric of the city.

“The function of a small hotel has been adjusted to reflect a small boutique brand,” says Katarzyna Waloryszak. “It’s about creating something that look unpretentious for people who appreciate comfort and design but don’t want to feel intimidated by it.”