Women on the up in the Polish workplace finds new global report

Poland has reduced female unemployment from 18 percent in 2000 to 5 percent in 2017. Claudio Hirschberger/Unsplash

Poland is ranked as one of the best countries in the world for female employees, a new report has found.

PwC’s ‘Labour Market Performance Index’ put Poland as the 8th best country for female employees while the country as a whole came 21st in the global rankings. Poland has now climbed 10 places since PwC’s first report in 2007.

 Female unemployment has fallen steadily since 2000.PwC

Female unemployment fell from 18 percent in 2000 to 5 percent in 2017, and the country now has the fourth highest percentage of female full-time employment at 90 percent, over double that of the Netherlands. Poland also has the second lowest gender pay gap at 5 percent with only Luxembourg performing better with 4 percent.

 'Poland, since 2000, has made the biggest leap in terms of accessibility and friendliness of the labour market for women, rising in that time by 11 positions,' said Anna Szczeblewska.PwC

“Poland, since 2000, has made the biggest leap in terms of accessibility and friendliness of the labour market for women, rising in that time by 11 positions,” said Anna Szczeblewska, leader of the People and Change team at PwC. “Our current 8th place is the result of gradually reducing the wage gap, the unemployment rate is lower among women and there is a large number of full-time female employees.”

 Poland now has one of the lowers gender pay gaps in the developed world.PwC

PwC also recognised that Poland has improved employment rates for those in the ‘Golden Age Index’ who are over 55. The future of employment will also likely be characterised by adjusting to the changing demands of the labour market, and employees in Poland are optimistic about the automation of jobs with 63 percent saying that automation creates more opportunities than threats. 

 'PwC analysis shows the huge economic potential that could be released in the event of greater professional activation of all groups,' said Mike Wilder.PwC

Polish workers are also more optimistic than their international counterparts in this respect and 89 percent of Polish employees are willing to improve their skills, and even retrain, to remain on the labour market. Already 87 percent of those who took part in the survey admitted that they have participated in courses and training in order to better understand new technologies.

 Poland is becoming one of the best countries in the world for female employees. PwC

“PwC analysis shows the huge economic potential that could be released in the event of greater professional activation of all groups,” said Mike Wilder, managing partner of the business consulting department at PwC Polska.