WANTED! Hunt gets underway for unnamed FEMALE war criminal in Germany

The identity of the 93-year-old former female concentration camp guard is being withheld from the public so that she does not go in to hiding as Poland’s IPN issues a European Arrest Warrant. Public domain

An arrest warrant for a 93-year-old former female SS concentration camp guard who tormented Warsaw Uprising heroines has been issued by Polish prosecutors.

The European Arrest Warrant was issued against a German citizen who was an SS Aufseherin, the name for female SS guards in German concentration camps during World War Two.

The woman, who at present remains unnamed, served in the Mittweida forced labour camp, which was a branch of the German concentration camp KL Flossenbürg. Pictured: Gate at Flossenbürg.Public domain

The woman, who at present remains unnamed, served in the Mittweida forced labour camp, which was a branch of the German concentration camp KL Flossenbürg.

Her arrest has been requested by the investigative division of the Institute of National Remembrance (IPN) in Poznań, which is conducting an investigation into the crimes committed at the Mittweida camp.

The woman being sought was an SS Aufseherin, the name for female SS guards in German concentration camps during WWII. Pictured are some of those captured and later punished for their bestiality. Public domain

IPN prosecutors said that the wanted guard is suspected of “complicity in committing crimes against humanity in the years 1944–1945 against Polish citizens imprisoned in this camp, consisting in their murders and deliberately creating conditions aimed at their biological destruction.”

She is accused of taking part in spring 1945 in the ‘death march’ of prisoners from Mittweida through Hainichen and Freiberg towards Prague.  During this evacuation, camp staff shot several dozen female prisoners, including two Polish women who could not keep up with the pace of the march. 

Prosecutors have established the details of 177 women imprisoned in the camp. They worked in the armaments company Lorenz AG. They performed heavy physical work 24 hours a day in a two-shift system.Flossenbürg Concentration Camp Memorial / Rainer Viertlböck

The Mittweida camp, established on 9 October 1944, was used to incarcerate women for forced labour, including Polish women captured after the outbreak of the Warsaw Uprising.

Polish prosecutors said: “The living conditions in the camp threatened human existence. Food rations were at the starvation level, there was no medical care. The use of the bathhouse was forbidden. Prisoners did not receive winter clothing for a long time. The activities of the camp command, including the female SS guards, consisted of terrorizing the prisoners, and the women prisoners were regularly beaten and mistreated.”

Around 500 women were held in the Mittweida camp, which lies around 60 kilometres west of Dresden. About 300 were from the Soviet Union, over 150 from Poland, 23 from Italy, and others from Yugoslavia, Croatia and Germany.Flossenbürg Concentration Camp Memorial

Prosecutors have established the details of 177 women imprisoned in the camp. They worked in the armaments company Lorenz AG. They performed heavy physical work 24 hours a day in a two-shift system.

The arrest warrant is an effect of the work of a special unit backed by prosecutors that the IPN created two years ago to determine the names of people who served in the SS during the war in concentration and extermination camps which the Third Reich authorities established in occupied Poland.

The  "death train" at the end of April 1945 at the train station in Roztoky near Prague, on which women from Mittweida were also sent. Archive of the Central Bohemian Museum

The list contains the names of around 23,000 people. Investigators believe that about 1,000 of them could still be alive. These would be people who were around twenty years old at the end of the war and would be in their nineties now.

At present, the IPN unit is carrying out eight concentration camp investigations. They concern crimes committed in Auschwitz-Birkenau, Gross-Rosen, Buchenwald, Treblinka, Majdanek, Ravensbrück, Mittelbau-Dora and Sachsenhausen.

Hundreds died as a result of the gruelling death marches.Public domain

Around 500 women were held in the Mittweida camp, which lies around 60 kilometres west of Dresden. About 300 were from the Soviet Union, over 150 from Poland, 23 from Italy, and others from Yugoslavia, Croatia and Germany.

The women worked gruelling shifts manufacturing synthetic resin parts for the electrical company C. Lorenz AG.

The women at the camp were quartered in barracks on grounds enclosed by a fence, not far from the factory.

The woman’s arrest has been requested by the investigative division of the Institute of National Remembrance (IPN) in Poznań, which is conducting an investigation into the crimes committed at the Mittweida camp.Instytut Pamięci Narodowej w Poznaniu/Facebook

There were nine male SS guards from Yugoslavia, and around 23 to 27 female guards.

The camp was hastily evacuated in mid-April 1945. The women had to march on foot to Freiberg and were then placed in open train wagons and transported in the direction of the Czech border.

Soviet troops liberated some prisoners in Prague in the beginning of May 1945. Others were transported to České Budějovice, where they were liberated by the U.S. Army.