Tree-mendous! ‘Human Forest hotel’ set to become the new eco-holiday trend

Designed by Gdańsk-based architects Jan Sikora and Andrzej Marek, the 'Human Forest' hotel places guests right in the forest, without the walls and roofs of traditional buildings, maximising contact with its sights and sounds. sikorawnetrza.com

A “Human Forest” hotel where guests live and sleep between the trees, giving them the full woodland holiday experience, has been designed by Polish architects.

Amid concern about the future of the planet, more architects are seeking to balance building and harmony with nature. 

In addition to the environmental benefits of this approach, it brings people in closer contact with the natural world, helping them escape the stress of life in the city and relax.

An image on Sikora’s website shows four arranged together, with canopies spread between them to provide further protection from the elements.sikorawnetrza.com

The “Human Forest” hotel places guests right in the forest, without the walls and roofs of traditional buildings, maximising contact with its sights and sounds.

Designed by Gdańsk-based architects Jan Sikora and Andrzej Marek, Sikora’s studio, which does interiors and architecture, has worked on a variety of projects, from libraries to railway stations.

The hotel is based around four modules covering basic human needs, like eating, sleeping and washing. sikorawnetrza.com

The hotel is based around four modules covering basic human needs, like eating, sleeping and washing. 

The structures have been designed to resemble trees, which allows them to blend into the forest. 

The structures have been designed to resemble trees, which allows them to blend into the forest. sikorawnetrza.com

With its inbuilt grill-like structure for cooking food, the kitchen module provides a designated place for preparing meals. The living module contains storage space, which can be used for everyday items. 

The bathroom module contains a toilet and shower, which uses rainwater collected in a tank at the top of the module. Like the rest of the hotel, these have no walls – there is only a curtain for privacy.

Architect Jan Sikora’s studio, which does interiors and architecture, has worked on a variety of projects, from libraries to railway stations.Jan Sikora/Facebook

The sleeping module features raised platforms for guests to sleep on, covered by clear, tent like structures. They can be reached by climbing the wooden rungs that stick out from the module. 

The raised structures help visitors stay safe and dry while they sleep. They can also use pulleys attached to the modules to store their luggage high above the ground, protecting it from wild animals and the damp forest ground.

The bathroom module contains a toilet and shower, which uses rainwater collected in a tank at the top of the module. Like the rest of the hotel, these have no walls – there is only a curtain for privacy.sikorawnetrza.com

Another advantage of the modules is that they can be grouped together in different configurations, depending on the site and the number of expected visitors. 

An image on Sikora’s website shows four arranged together, with canopies spread between them to provide further protection from the elements.