Treblinka death camp tragedy will never be forgotten - Polish PM

Treblinka was one of the main extermination sites for European Jews, the death count coming second only to the main Holocaust site Auschwitz in south Poland. Wojciech Pacewicz/PAP

"We are honouring the fallen in this unequal fight and paying homage to all Holocaust victims," the Polish prime minister wrote in a letter read out during observances of the 77th anniversary of a prisoner revolt at the Treblinka Nazi German death camp on Sunday.

The ceremony was held at a memorial on the Treblinka site (eastern Poland).

"The tragedy of Treblinka and other WWII death sites will be remembered by next generations," the prime minister said, adding that "today, at the site of remembrance of Jews, who were brought here by the Germans from Poland and all Europe, we are paying homage to the murdered. During 15 months of its operations, the death factory in Treblinka II took the lives of nearly 900,000 people. A dozen or so thousand human beings a day."

PM Morawiecki underlined that on August 2, 1943, camp inmates started an armed uprising in the middle of hell, and repeated that the tragedy would never be forgotten.

In a letter, Deputy PM and Culture Minister Piotr Gliński wrote that a modern man could not understand the scale of the Holocaust committed by Nazi Germany in this place. He underlined that around 900,000 Jews, of whom some 90 percent were Polish citizens, had been murdered in Treblinka II.

Gliński recalled that for a year and a half the Polish state "has been taking care of the Treblinka Remembrance Site."

Exactly 77 years ago, on August 2, 1943, over 800 inmates staged an armed revolt in the infamous Treblinka Nazi German death camp in east Poland. It is estimated that around 300 of them managed to escape. Only 70 survived World War II.

Nazi Germany launched the construction of the Treblinka concentration camp on June 1, 1942, as part of its 'Operation Reinhard' plan to exterminate European Jews. It is estimated that nearly 900,000 Europeans of Jewish descent were murdered there. The vast majority, about 760,000, were Polish citizens.

Treblinka was one of the main extermination sites for European Jews, the death count coming second only to the main Holocaust site Auschwitz in south Poland.

The first transport of Polish citizens of Jewish descent from the Warsaw Ghetto arrived in the camp on July 23, 1942. By September 21, it had received 254,000 Warsaw Ghetto inhabitants.