Three quarters of Poles believe themselves 'middle-class' - study

When asked about financial status, 82 percent of people claimed to be moderately prosperous, 16 percent considered themselves poor, while almost nobody declared the highest financial status. Grzegorz Momot/PAP

Three in four Poles put themselves in the middle class of society, while around one in six of them claim to belong to the 'lower class,' according to a study by research pollster CBOS.

Respondents were asked to determine their social rank on the basis of a scale from one to nine, where one meant 'lower class', and nine was assigned to the 'upper class'.

The study shows that the 'middle class' remains the favored self-designation; the percentage of Poles who select it amounted to 76.1 percent.

Some 16.9 percent of respondents claim to be representatives of the 'lower class,' while 4.5 percent of Poles believe they belong to the 'upper class'.

According to the study, the self-perception of social rank depends on educational and material standing. The higher the level of education and the better the assessment of people's financial situation, the higher the position in the social hierarchy.

Ten years earlier, the percentages of people who assigned themselves to the lower, middle, and upper classes were 26.8 percent, 63.5 percent and 5.9 percent, respectively.

When asked about financial status, 82 percent of people claimed to be moderately prosperous, 16 percent considered themselves poor, while almost nobody declared the highest financial status.

CBOS conducted face-to-face surveys on a representative random sample of 944 adult respondents on November 7-17, 2019, and on a sample of 910 adult Poles on November 28 - December 5, 2019.