Spectacular immersive Warsaw experience takes viewers on journey into world of BBC Earth film crew

Projected onto a surface area of 800 sq/m using state-of-the-art equipment, it’s a striking work that takes guests past powerful volcanic eruptions, dancing bolts of lightning, gigantic six-storey waves and to the Northern Lights themselves. Kalbar/TFN

Acting as the ultimate teaser for an upcoming BBC series, a pop-up installation promises to thrill those visiting Warsaw’s revamped Norblin Factory this weekend.

Titled Spectacular Earth after the programme’s name, the immersive exhibition is the latest attraction at Norblin’s acclaimed Artbox Experience.

Open only for the duration of today and tomorrow, those visiting will find themselves thrust into an electrifying world aimed at demonstrating the raw, blistering might of mother nature. 

Taking three-weeks of round-the-clock work, the exhibition was purposefully designed so as not to deliver any spoilers ahead of the November 9th premier of the Spectacular Earth programme.Kalbar/TFN

Projected onto a surface area of 800 sq/m using state-of-the-art equipment, it’s a striking work that takes guests past powerful volcanic eruptions, dancing bolts of lightning, gigantic six-storey waves and to the Northern Lights themselves.

Conceptualised and executed by Marta Grytczuk and Aleksandra Jeglińska, from the outset this ravishing spectacle was intended as something of a tribute to the scientists and photographers engaged in the BBC project.

Speaking to TFN, the duo said: “We watched the programme before coming up with this concept and wanted to bring the awe and amazement felt by those that worked on it to the public.

Seamlessly synced with blissfully ambient sounds, and featuring no shortage of poufs on which to lounge, it causes people to pause and consider the wider world.Kalbar/TFN

“It’s not an immersive experience just for the sake of it, but rather something that was required given the source material.”

Taking three-weeks of round-the-clock work, the exhibition was purposefully designed so as not to deliver any spoilers ahead of the November 7th premier of the Spectacular Earth programme.

“We wanted this to be a little abstract, so we consciously didn’t want to tread down an educational path,” they say.

For this reason, none of the phenomena that are featured are captioned, and instead visitors are left to wander the chambers and absorb themselves in independent thought.

Conceptualised and executed by Marta Grytczuk and Aleksandra Jeglińska, from the outset this ravishing spectacle was intended as something of a tribute to the scientists and photographers engaged in the BBC project.Kalbar/TFN

Seamlessly synced with blissfully ambient sounds, and featuring no shortage of poufs on which to lounge, it causes people to pause and consider the wider world. 

“We want to elicit different reactions,” say Grytczuk and Jeglińska. “Rather than teaching people, we wanted to lead people to the show itself by instead making them think a little and triggering a more emotional response.”

This has been done via an intelligent editing process that saw the team using a non-standard approach.

“We weren’t editing in the traditional sense of the word,” they say, “but by using VR so as to really customise these projections to the space.”

Kalbar/TFN

Grytczuk (L) and Jeglińska (R) say they hope the exhibition presents ‘an amuse bouche of what BBC Earth have prepared with their Spectacular Earth programme’.Kalbar/TFN

With both the sound and video team collaborating closely to create a coherent mood and atmosphere, there is an underlying magic at work that leaves no doubt as to the power and beauty of planet earth.

“Essentially,” they say, “what we hope to have achieved is to have presented a little taste, an amuse bouche if you will, of what BBC Earth have prepared with their Spectacular Earth programme.”