Rzeszów train station eyes up palatial makeover

The subject of recent controversy between local art historians, conservators, architects and residents concerned over the station’s final appearance, the latest idea presents a palatial design set on two levels. Press materials

A new visualization for the renovation of Rzeszów railway station could see the location return to its original early renaissance classical style.

The subject of recent controversy between local art historians, conservators, architects and residents concerned over the station’s final appearance, the latest idea presents a palatial design set on two levels.

Press materials

Designed by Sebastian Pitoń, an architect from Podhale in Poland’s Tatra mountains, the renovation will include decorative elements on the elevation, a glass tent roof over the high-ceilinged hallway and the symbol of the winged wheel over the arches of the windows.Press materials

Designed by Sebastian Pitoń, an architect from Podhale in Poland’s Tatra mountains, the renovation will include decorative elements on the elevation, a glass tent roof over the high-ceilinged hallway and the symbol of the winged wheel over the arches of the windows.

First built in 1858 as part of the railway line connecting Vienna, Kraków and Lwów, Rzeszów railway station was originally constructed in a style alluding to a city palace, based on early renaissance solutions first seen in Florentine architecture.

First built in 1858 as part of the railway line connecting Vienna, Kraków and Lwów, Rzeszów railway station was originally constructed in a style alluding to a city palace, based on early renaissance solutions first seen in Florentine architecture.Polska-org.pl

Describing himself as someone who “tries to act in aid of restoring prestige to architecture which is searching for beauty and which is rooted in tradition”, Pitoń told local news portal Rzeszów Nasze Miasto: “I sometimes design these types of buildings as I believe that if something was built say 200 years ago and today we still consider it to be beautiful, that it has stood the test of time, then I don’t see the need to build in a modernist style which trivialises the theme of beauty”.

Agnieszka Jurewicz from Polish State Railways Warsaw which is behind the investment into the renovation said: “We are currently at the stage of verifiying the project design and getting permission for the building work.

The final decision about the station’s appearance will depend on the conservator of monuments which is reported to be in favour of keeping the building in the modernist form used in its restoration during the Communist era.Darek Delmanowicz/PAP

“If everything goes well, we plan to start building work in the first half of this year.”

The final decision about the station’s appearance, however,  will depend on the conservator of monuments which is reported to be in favour of keeping the building in the modernist form used in its restoration during the Communist era.