Prosecutor General calls for Polish Communist Party to be outlawed

In Ziobro's opinion, "setting the goal of introducing a communist system in Poland, modelled on Soviet Russia, is an appeal to the totalitarian methods and practices of communism." Radek Pietruszka/PAP

Polish Prosecutor General Zbigniew Ziobro has filed a motion with the Constitutional Tribunal (TK) to outlaw the Polish Communist Party (KPP), accused of having links with a totalitarian regime.

"Actions in this area were taken at the request of natural persons. In the letters addressed to the prosecutor's office, they indicated that the Polish Communist Party, among other things, refers in its programme and practices to the totalitarian methods and practices of communism, which is inconsistent with the Polish Constitution," the motion reads.

The National Prosecutor's Office (PK) claims members of the KPP directly call for a revolution similar to the October Revolution in Russia, after which the Bolsheviks took power. The PK said they also glorify and legitimise all actions taken by Soviet Russia's leaders, responsible for Russia's invasion of Poland in 1939, mass deportations and the eradication of the Polish anti-Communist resistance movement.

In Ziobro's opinion, "setting the goal of introducing a communist system in Poland, modelled on Soviet Russia, is an appeal to the totalitarian methods and practices of communism."

The Polish Prosecutor General requested that the TK declare the aims and activities of the KPP inconsistent with the Polish constitution.

The Polish Communist Party was founded in 2002 claiming to be the historical and ideological heir of the inter-war Communist Party of Poland. The KPP's agenda also refers to the traditions of the post-war Polish Workers' Party and partly of the Polish United Workers' Party, the official organisation of the communist regime that collapsed in 1989.