Poznań choirs come together with hauntingly beautiful performance to inspire hope during dark days of killer virus

Conductor Jacek Sykulski, who led the performance in a dark suit and a mask, said: “People are meeting who have a need to bring hope – for themselves, at this tough time for musicians, as well as for others.” Poznański Chór Chłopięcy/Facebook

Choirs from across Poznań have come together for a special performance that offers the world hope and solidarity through music as it struggles against the coronavirus.

Meeting in the city’s 17th century Roman Catholic basilica Fara, and standing far apart and wearing masks, their voices resonated inside the vast church as they performed a hauntingly beautiful rendition of  a wordless piece called “The Peace Meditation.”

The singers said they had joined up because “the longing for making music together began to bother us.”Poznański Chór Chłopięcy/Facebook

Conductor Jacek Sykulski, who led the performance in a dark suit and a mask, said: “People are meeting who have a need to bring hope – for themselves, at this tough time for musicians, as well as for others.”

Sykulski brought together the singers from various choirs in Poznań, along with soloists who posted on Facebook: “The longing for making music together began to bother us so much that we decided to look for a platform of this kind for a live meeting, which would enable us to at least partly satisfy the artistic hunger for personal interaction.”

The choirs performed a hauntingly beautiful rendition of  a wordless piece called “The Peace Meditation.”Poznański Chór Chłopięcy/Facebook

The piece was originally created in 2001, following the terrorist attacks in New York on 9/11.

The following year, the Academic Choir from Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań performed it on “Ground Zero” in Lower Manhattan, conducted by Sykulski.

The piece was originally created in 2001, following the terrorist attacks in New York on 9/11.Poznański Chór Chłopięcy/Facebook

Almost two decades later, the world faces massive health-related, rather than security, challenges as countries fight to stop the spread of the coronavirus.

Despite the very different circumstances, the piece continues to offer an antidote to darkness and despair.

Sykulski said the piece “is a song of hope: that what seems impossible to us can be done.”Poznański Chór Chłopięcy/Facebook

Sykulski said: “It is also a song of hope: that what seems impossible to us can be done.”

The video has now been posted online.