Polish, Slovenian PMs call on Germany to withdraw from Nord Stream 2

Morawiecki (R) said that "Nord Stream 2 is a German-Russian project that destabilises Europe and undermines European security." Marcin Obara/PAP

The Polish and Slovenian prime ministers have called on Germany to pull out of the Nord Stream 2 pipeline project, saying it destabilises Europe.

The call came following a meeting between Mateusz Morawiecki and Janez Jansa, his Slovenian counterpart, in Warsaw.

At a joint press conference Morawiecki described the project, which will take Russian gas to Germany under the Baltic Sea, as a constant "wound" to Europe that "must be dealt with in such a way that European solidarity does not suffer.”

The project has encountered fierce resistance from Poland, other Central European states and the USA.

"There are German voices saying that there is no difference between a molecule of gas flowing through Nord Stream 1 or Nord Stream 2 in the future - hopefully not - and a molecule of gas flowing through Ukraine, Belarus, Poland or Turkey," Morawiecki said.

"There is a huge difference,” he continued. “Maybe there is no difference in the chemical make-up, but there is a political difference, a social difference and (a difference) for the security of Europe."

Morawiecki went on to say that "Nord Stream 2 is a German-Russian project that destabilises Europe and undermines European security."

"We call on Germany to withdraw from that project in order to stop further influence on the factual destabilisation of that part of Europe, because it can be very threatening for the European Union and for many states of the region," he said.

The two heads of government went on to demand an acceleration in the distribution of Covid-19 vaccinations, saying that pressure on the European Commission and European Council had been very effective as there are now more vaccines available.

"We could not stand on the sidelines on this issue, only together, arm in arm, together with Janez, together with the Visegrad Group, in order to vaccinate a sufficiently large number of the population as quickly as possible," he said.