Polish president opposes mandatory vaccination

Andrzej Duda told private broadcaster Polsat News on Monday that he would "strongly hesitate" to introduce compulsory vaccinations even for individual professional groups. Marek Borawski/KPRP

The Polish president has said he is against obligatory vaccinations as introducing this could have "social consequences."

Poland made it mandatory for all medics, pharmacists and medical students to get vaccinated against Covid-19 under a health minister's decree sent for publication last Thursday.

Andrzej Duda told private broadcaster Polsat News on Monday that he would "strongly hesitate" to introduce compulsory vaccinations even for individual professional groups.

"I am a supporter of urging people to get vaccinated, but imposing compulsory vaccinations still raises my doubts... because I am concerned about the social consequences this will have for us," he said.

"I am afraid there will be very strong social opposition and I am very worried about this situation," he added.

At the same time, Duda admitted that he would support "creating some pressure" on people to get vaccinated.

He also said that mandatory vaccinations "would have to be introduced at the statutory level" and he would only consider signing a bill to this effect only after it is accepted by parliament.