Polish embassy protests against 'Polish concentration camp' misnomer

An estimated 65,000 people perished in the Nazi German Stutthof camp, 28,000 of whom were of Jewish descent. Przemysław Piątkowski/PAP

The Polish embassy in Rome has protested against the false phrase 'Polish concentration camp,' used by an Italian daily in reference to the German concentration camp Stutthof.

"This phrase is abusive," the embassy wrote on Twitter on Thursday.

"There were no 'Polish Nazi camps'," Ambassador Anna Maria Anders stated.

The diplomat also asked the daily to correct the false and deceiving phrase which was abusive to the Polish people, who "suffered so much during WWII when Poland was occupied by Nazi Germany."

The Stutthof camp started operation on September 2, 1939, near a town of the same name (today Sztutowo in Poland's northern Pomorskie province). Initially intended as a prison for the local Polish population, it was transformed into a concentration camp in 1942 and began to receive inmates from various parts of Europe.

An estimated 65,000 people perished in the camp, 28,000 of whom were of Jewish descent. According to historians, the camp's female population numbered around 46,000.