Polish, Czech PMs discuss tackling inflation

Mateusz Morawiecki, the Polish prime minister, and his Czech counterpart, Petr Fiala, met in Prague on Friday as part of broader inter-governmental consultations. Marcin Obara/PAP

The Polish and Czech prime ministers have discussed “joint efforts” to tackle the problem of high inflation, now troubling both countries.

Mateusz Morawiecki, the Polish prime minister, and his Czech counterpart, Petr Fiala, met in Prague on Friday as part of broader inter-governmental consultations.

Poland's latest consumer price inflation reading is 13.9 percent year on year, while the most recent figure for the Czech Republic is 14.2 percent. In the case of Poland, it is the highest level since 1998, while Czechs last saw such high inflation in 1993.

"Joint efforts to remedy the problem (of inflation – PAP) and its outcomes constituted a very important part of our talks on the economy," Morawiecki said.

The Polish prime minister dismissed accusations that the governments were partly responsible for the inflation.

"We both agreed that all these attacks that attribute inflation to what our governments do... are politically motivated and fundamentally flawed since every economist knows that the main causes of elevated inflation are the high costs of energy, gas, electricity, oil and other elements related to the war (in Ukraine - PAP) and food prices," Morawiecki said.

The Polish government has been criticised by some economists and the opposition for adding fuel to inflation by continuing large-scale social transfers, while the central bank has been lambasted for starting its interest rate hikes too late, when inflation was already approaching 7 percent.