Poles back president's response to Russia's information attack - poll

Sixty percent of Poles positively assess the actions taken by President Andrzej Duda and Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki on the international stage after Russian President Vladimir Putin verbally attacked Poland, according to a survey by IBRiS pollster.

Sixty percent of Poles positively assess the actions taken by President Andrzej Duda and Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki on the international stage after Russian President Vladimir Putin verbally attacked Poland, according to a survey by IBRiS pollster.

Twenty-nine percent of the respondents held a opposite view and 11 percent had no opinion on the matter.

Support for the president's and prime minister's activities exceeds by far the support that the ruling party Law and Justice (PiS) and the president recorded in recent polls, which shows that the Polish public stand behind their representatives in the event of an external attack, IBRiS wrote in a comment to survey results.

"Poles have noticed the diplomatic offensive undertaken by the Polish authorities in connection with the false and offensive statements by the Russian president," IBRiS wrote.

According to IBRiS, the poll also shows that Poles did not accept the view promoted by opposition which demanded that Duda convene a National Security Council, neither did they agree with a negative assessment of Duda's refusal to attend the World Holocaust Forum in Yad Vashem, Jerusalem.

The forum was held on January 23 as part of the 75th anniversary of the liberation of the Auschwitz death camp that Nazi Germany built and operated on Polish territory. Polish President Andrzej Duda refused to attend the event as he would have no chance to respond to Putin's potential accusations because the floor was only offered to his Israeli, German and Russian counterparts, as well as representatives of Great Britian and the United States.

Putin has recently purported that Poland had been complicit in the outbreak of World War II in response to a European Parliament resolution which said Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union were the two totalitarian regimes that paved the way for WWII.

The resolution states that "as a direct consequence of the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact (signed 23 August 1939 - PAP), followed by the Nazi-Soviet Boundary and Friendship Treaty of 28 September 1939, the Polish Republic was invaded first by Hitler and two weeks later by Stalin – which stripped the country of its independence and was an unprecedented tragedy for the Polish people – the communist Soviet Union started an aggressive war against Finland on 30 November 1939, and in June 1940 it occupied and annexed parts of Romania – territories that were never returned – and annexed the independent republics of Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia."

At a December 20 sitting of the Eurasian Economic Union, Putin offered his alternative version of history, saying the immediate cause of World War Two was not the August 1939 Ribbentrop-Molotov Pact between Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union but the 1938 Munich Pact, which secured the cession to Germany of Czechoslovakia's Sudeten German territory and which Poland attempted to use to secure its claims to the Zaolzie region, over which it was in dispute with Czechoslovakia.

He also accused Poland's pre-war government of fostering ties to Nazi Germany, by which he said they "exposed their people, the Polish people, to the German war machine and contributed to the outbreak of World War Two."