Poland, Latvia criticise NS2 pipeline - PM Morawiecki

"Latvia and Poland share the view that the gas pipeline should not strengthen the blackmail arsenal in the hands of the Russian president," Morawiecki said. Leszek Szymański/PAP

Poland and Latvia both see the negative impact on energy security of the Russia-Germany Nord Stream 2 (NS2) gas pipeline, Mateusz Morawiecki, the Polish prime minister, said after talks with his Latvian counterpart, Arturs Krisjanis Karins.

Speaking at a press conference after the meeting in Warsaw, Morawiecki said the Kremlin has just gained a new tool for exerting pressure on Europe.

"Latvia and Poland share the view that the gas pipeline should not strengthen the blackmail arsenal in the hands of the Russian president," Morawiecki said.

NS2 is a controversial Russia-Germany natural gas pipeline, which bypasses Ukraine and endangers, according to its critics, energy security in Eastern Europe. Despite the criticism of NS2 Germany claims it is a purely business project.

"We appeal to our German partners to sober up, we appeal to them to realise what huge risks are involved with handing this blackmail tool over to Moscow," the Polish prime minister warned.

Morawiecki also tried to win Karins' support in the criticism of the EU's emission allowance trading system, the EU ETS. Poland blames the scheme for exorbitant gas and electricity prices in Europe.

"On the one hand there is Russia, and on the other hand there is the irresponsible and dogmatic ETS policy, or the EU's climate policy," Morawiecki said and added that the ETS system is prone to speculation "from various financial and non-financial investors".

"In such an arrangement, energy prices depend on market speculation instead of regulatory or market forces that are specific for the energy market only," Morawiecki argued.

The Latvian prime minister said his government supported the EU's green transition, but added that citizens cannot be covering its costs through energy bills.

"Therefore the transition should be going in a direction that is viable for Latvia and Poland," Karins said.