Poland and Germany could become allies in migration - expert

Knaus described the Polish-Ukrainian border (which is an EU external frontier) as functioning perfectly and added that it should be an example. /PAP/EPA

Gerald Knaus, the chairman of the Berlin-based European Stability Initiative (ESI) think tank, believes that Poland and Germany could act together to limit unregulated migration from Africa and the Middle East.

In an interview with PAP, Knaus stressed that Poland and Germany could become allies, as far as migration was concerned, because their views on this problem were 90 percent similar to each other. He underlined that the EU should depart from the dead issue of a forced division of migrants and added he had always opposed this plan. He also said that Germany had already started to share this view.

According to the expert, the ongoing EU debate on migration is strongly ideologised. He expressed his hope that this would change in the new European Commission and added that this problem should also be resolved between Poland and Germany "since the two countries must cooperate in many other areas."

He said that if this problem disappeared, there would only be left the common interest of reducing unregulated migration on the EU external border.

Knaus emphasised that threats made by France or Luxemburg that countries which do not admit refugees should be excluded from the Schengen zone were absurd, also from the point of view of Germany. He stressed that the Polish-German border was a history of success since it was invisible, and that nobody in Germany wanted the 'strong' frontier to return.

The expert described the Polish-Ukrainian border (which is an EU external frontier) as functioning perfectly and added that it should be an example. He stressed that no one wanted to build a wall on the border with a country, which was in a state of war, which had 44 million citizens, and where the per capita income was lower than in Morocco. He also said that there was no debate on this subject either in Poland or in the EU, and that, on the contrary, additional border crossings were being built since there existed visa-free traffic.

Knaus pointed to the fact that the situation in other places in Europe was not so optimistic, and underlined that none of the problems causing migration had been solved, and that Europe still failed to reduce unregulated migration through the use of legal means.