Poland accuses Putin of spreading disinformation

Putin, according to Reuters, repeated on Russia's National Unity Day on Friday a claim that Poland had not abandoned dreams of taking over parts of Ukraine. GRIGORY SYSOEV SPUTNIK / KREMLIN POOL/PAP/EPA

The Polish government commissioner for information space security has accused the Russian president of repeating insinuations which present Poland as an aggressive country.

Putin, according to Reuters, repeated on Russia's National Unity Day on Friday a claim that Poland had not abandoned dreams of taking over parts of Ukraine.

Addressing a meeting with historians, the Russian president said the "Poland from sea to sea" slogan had been very popular before World War Two but remained "an idee fixe" at that time.

However, the idea is still alive, and plans to take over parts of Ukraine have not vanished, Putin was quoted as saying.

"We have been dealing once again with insinuations, which are detached from reality, and which are designed to show Poland as an aggressive country posing a threat to Western Ukraine," Stanisław Żaryn said.

"But if we look at these insinuations from a broader perspective, (Poland - PAP) is to be seen as a warmonger which has been allegedly posing a threat to the security in Central Europe," he added.

According to Żaryn, the aim of the false theses spread by Russian propaganda is to discredit Poland and to show Russia as a safeguard of peace and stability.

Poland has repeatedly denied such Russian claims and says such statements are disinformation being spread by Moscow in an attempt to sow discord between Warsaw and Kyiv.

National Unity Day commemorates a Russian popular uprising that freed Moscow from Polish-Lithuanian occupation forces on November 4, 1612.