Plaque commemorating Isaac Bashevis Singer unveiled in Warsaw

Isaac Bashevis Singer was born in the village of Leoncin, near Warsaw in 1902. Later he lived in Warsaw, and in 1935 he emigrated to the US. Jakub Kamiński/PAP

A plaque commemorating Polish-born Jewish writer and Nobel Prize laureate Isaac Bashevis Singer was unveiled on Krochmalna Street in Warsaw, where Singer lived with his family 110 years ago.

The ceremony was held as part of the 15th edition of the "Singer's Warsaw" Jewish Culture Festival, now under way in Warsaw.

Warsaw deputy Mayor Renata Kaznowska told the gathering that Krochmalna Street is "a symbolic place, one of the best known Warsaw streets," and that it was destroyed by the Germans during the Second World War.

She also said that the plaque's inscription was in three languages, namely, "in Polish as we are in Warsaw, in Yiddish as this was Isaac Singer's language, and in English, in order to make it possible for foreign visitors to feel the place."

The ceremony was attended by Singer's granddaughter Meirav Hen, who said that her every visit to Poland was an occasion to feel what her grandfather felt when he was thinking about Warsaw.

Also present was Israeli Ambassador to Poland Anna Azari and the director of the Jewish Theatre in Warsaw, Gołda Tencer.

Isaac Bashevis Singer, the son and grandson of rabbis on both sides of his family, was born in the village of Leoncin, near Warsaw in 1902. Later he lived in Warsaw, and in 1935 he emigrated to the US. He received the Nobel Literature Prize in 1978.

The programme of the 15th 'Singer's Warsaw' Jewish Culture Festival envisages concerts, performances, film screenings, exhibitions, literary meetings and culinary workshops. The Polish Press Agency PAP is the media patron of the event.