No kidding! Poland one of the best places to raise children, says new report

In the ranking, Poland was followed by Norway, Spain and Denmark, with Britain in 10th place. Three other countries in Central Europe — Hungary, Slovakia and Bulgaria — closed the ranking. Jenn Evelyn-Ann on Unsplash

Poland is one of the best countries in Europe to raise a child, according to a new ranking by London-based consumer research company NimbleFins.

Plenty of factors can influence the quality of childhood, from nutrition to education. Often, these early experiences can have lasting effects, shaping people’s health and professional life well into adulthood.

For its ranking, NimbleFins studied health and lifestyle data for young people in 29 European countries, taken from sources such as the World Health Organisation and Eurostat. They ranked them in three broad categories: health, including how much they exercise and how healthily they eat, use of harmful substances such as cigarettes or drugs, and educational attainment, which includes English language and IT skills.

The country also did well in the education category where it ranked 11th and 9th.pan xiaozhen on Unsplash

Poland ranked third overall, after Sweden and Luxembourg. It did extremely well in the “smoking, alcohol and drugs category”, where it came third. This can be explained by the low number of young people in Poland who smoke or drink: 81% of 15 to 24-year-olds are non-smokers and just 13% of them drink daily or weekly, according to numbers cited by NimbleFins.

The country also did well in the “health and safety” and “education” categories, where it ranked 11th and 9th.

Young Poles’ healthy diet helped in the former, with the company pointing out that  55% eat fruit and 51% eat vegetables daily. Plenty of factors can influence the quality of childhood, from nutrition to education. Often, these early experiences can have lasting effects, shaping people’s health and professional life well into adulthood.Nadine Primeau on Unsplash

Young Poles’ healthy diet helped in the former, with the company pointing out that  55% eat fruit and 51% eat vegetables daily. At 2.5%, the obesity rate also compared well to other countries, especially Britain and Ireland, where it was more than double that.

They were, however, exposed to significantly worse air, measured in terms of the concentration of PM2.5 particles in the air.

In terms of education, young Poles turned out to be pretty good at using basic arithmetic formulae in a spreadsheet, with 70% able to do it. They also ranked 14th in terms of English proficiency, with 92.8% of them taught the language at secondary school.

NimbleFins studied health and lifestyle data for young people in 29 European countries and ranked them in three broad categories: health, including how much they exercise and how healthily they eat, use of harmful substances such as cigarettes or drugs, and educational attainment, which includes English language and IT skills.Jeffrey F Lin on Unsplash

Despite Poland’s strong result, NimbleFins notes that there is still room for improvement, for example, in the number of children getting enough physical exercise, measles vaccinations, and learning how to code.

Poland was followed by Norway, Spain and Denmark, with Britain in 10th place. Three other countries in Central Europe — Hungary, Slovakia and Bulgaria — closed the ranking.

The original study can be read HERE.