Mask and you shall receive! Gdańsk National Museum issues series of beautiful art face masks

The National Museum has launched a series of masks that combine function with culture, which will bring its collection to a wider audience, outside its own walls. Muzeum Narodowe w Gdańsku

The National Museum in Gdańsk has created masks showcasing works of art in its collection.

With COVID-19 still not under control, people in many countries have been required or advised to wear masks in certain places in public, such as when travelling by plane or by train.

Some of the designs feature fragments from the painting “The Last Judgement”, a triptych by Flemish painter Hans Memling that was painted between 1467 and 1473. Muzeum Narodowe w Gdańsku

In Poland, people do not have to wear masks when they go outside for a walk, but face coverings are required on public transport and in shops, among other places.

Over the past few months, the range of masks being sold has exploded, from masks adapted to cyclists to ones that allow wearers to express their personal style with a choice of patterns and colours.

The other two feature fragments from an 18th century decorative altar hanging from Gdańsk bearing Catherine of Vadstena, and from a silk velvet chasuble from Venice during the late 15th century.Muzeum Narodowe w Gdańsku

In Gdańsk, the National Museum has launched a series of masks that combine function with culture, which will bring its collection to a wider audience, outside its own walls.

They can also be worn to explore the Museum, where visitor now have to cover their nose and mouth because of the virus.

The Museum shared photos of several designs, each with one of its works of art printed on it. Each of them has three layers and is made of folded fabric, with side loops that go over the wearer’s ears to keep the mask in place.

Each of the masks has three layers and is made of folded fabric, with side loops that go over the wearer’s ears to keep the mask in place.Muzeum Narodowe w Gdańsku

Some of the designs feature a fragment from the painting “The Last Judgement”, a triptych by Flemish painter Hans Memling that was painted between 1467 and 1473.

It features winged figures, who are printed on to the fabric and partly covered by the mask’s folds, as well as the Museum’s logo.

The other two feature fragments from an 18th century decorative altar hanging from Gdańsk bearing Catherine of Vadstena, and from a silk velvet chasuble from Venice during the late 15th century. Like “The Last Judgement”, both are now part of the Museum’s collection.

The masks can be bought at branches of the Museum in Gdańsk. They can also be ordered online by sending an email to sklep@mng.gda.pl.