Lublin scientists who laser-scanned ancient city of Samarkand open exhibition to show off their work

The high tech scanners, which were brought over from the Computer Science Institute to Uzbekistan, are designed to scan historic objects in order to measure their exact dimensions for cataloging. The tool also proves incredibly helpful in digitally reconstructing decayed artifacts in 3D for restoration planning. Instytut Informatyki

A new exhibition curated by scientists from the Lublin University of Technology will open today to showcase their first expedition to the ancient city of Samarkand, Uzbekistan and their growing cooperation with the academics from the Samarkand State University (SamSU).

Entitled the ”First Scientific Expedition of Lublin University of Technology to Central Asia, 2017” the exhibition will include a collection of multimedia and photographs devoted to chronicling the team’s first expedition to the region and the collaborative project to help Samarkand conserve their cultural heritage.

The expedition, which took place in May 2017, was organized by the deputy heads of the Institute of Computer Science, Dr Jerzy Montusiewicz, and Dr Marek Miłosz. The team also included Dr Jacek Kęsik, Dr Marcin Barszcz and Dr Krzysztof Dziedzic who are all members of the 3D lab at the university.

During the expedition to the 2,500-year-old city, the five scientists met and cultivated relations with museum curators, as well as academics and researchers of SamSU. The two institutions have been formally co-operating since 2014.

Using their state-of-the-art 3D laser scanner, the scientists measured the intricate entry portal of the building and now plan to create an accurate computer reconstruct of the school’s lofty front facade for its long term planned restoration.Instytut Informatyki

Another element of the Lublin scientists’ mission in Uzbekistan was to conserve and digitize artefacts from both the SamSU museum and the famous Afrasiab archaeological museum with their state-of-the-art laser scanning system.

On the Pollub.pl site, Deputy Head of the Computer Science Institute at Lublin University of Technology, Dr Jerzy Montusiewicz, wrote, “Leaving for Uzbekistan, we took with us two manual 3D scanners working in structural light technology, which also allowed us to register the texture of scanned objects, and specialised laptops with very large computing powers.” 

The high tech scanners, which were brought over from the Computer Science Institute to Uzbekistan, are designed to scan historic objects in order to measure their exact dimensions for cataloging.

The tool also proves incredibly helpful in digitally reconstructing decayed artifacts in 3D for restoration planning.

Another element of the Lublin scientists’ mission in Uzbekistan was to conserve and digitize artefacts from both the SamSU museum and the famous Afrasiab archaeological museum with their state-of-the-art laser scanning system.Instytut Informatyki

During their first expedition, the team made scans of 55 museum objects, equalling a combined 75GB of data.

“In addition, we conducted scientific seminars at the SamSU University and searched for interesting architectural monuments in Samarkand, Szabhizas and in Tashkent that would be related to the legacy of the “Silk Road”, which could be digitised during subsequent trips.” Dr Montusiewicz wrote

Since their first expedition in 2017, the Polish computer science experts have also taken a second expedition to Uzbekistan to help save the famous structure of Sher Dor medres, a Muslim theological school. 

Using their state-of-the-art 3D laser scanner, the scientists measured the intricate entry portal of the building and now plan to create an accurate computer reconstruct of the school’s lofty front facade for its long term planned restoration. 

Now, the Lublin team are sorting the data gathered to hand over to the Uzbekistan government so restoration can begin. According to Dr Montusiewicz, more work on the Sher Dor medres will be needed.

The exhibit of the 2017 expedition to Uzbekistan is open from 2PM today until 28th February at the Gallery of the Library of the Lublin University of Technology.