London architects install stunning ‘levitating theatre’ in grounds of Polish manor house

Fluid in shape and covered with dark floorboards, the stage is nestled between trees in the manor’s grounds. Without the walls of a traditional theatre, the stage draws in the audience and the surrounding natural surroundings. Unism Studio

A London-based design studio run by two architecture students has built a “levitating theatre” in the grounds of a Polish manor house.

A cross between an outdoor stage, dining table and sculpture, the installation seeks to challenge boundaries between performers and audiences.

Fluid in shape and covered with dark floorboards, the stage is nestled between trees in the manor’s grounds. Without the walls of a traditional theatre, the stage draws in the audience and the surrounding natural surroundings.

The edges are covered with a mirror panels, which reflects the surrounding grass and trees, making it look like the stage is floating above the ground unsupported. As dusk falls, the stage can be lit from below, adding to the other-worldly atmosphere.Unism Studio

The edges are covered with a mirror panels, which reflects the surrounding grass and trees, making it look like the stage is floating above the ground unsupported. As dusk falls, the stage can be lit from below, adding to the other-worldly atmosphere.

The manor in the village of Bronice-Kolonia, near Lublin, was built at the start of the 19th Century. After the Second World War, it was neglected for decades. In 2014, it returned to the Wolk-Laniewskis, the family that had owned it before the war, and regained its role as a cultural space.

The stage was designed by London-based Unism Studio, which works with a variety of media from architecture to film.Unism Studio

The stage was designed by London-based Unism Studio, which works with a variety of media from architecture to film.

It was co-founded by two architecture students in London, Artur Zakrzewski and Konrad Weka. Zakrzewski is at UCL’s Bartlett School of Architecture and Weka at the Architectural Association.

According to the designers: “The Levitating Theatre was conceived as an idea questioning the boundaries that currently lie between different expressions of Art in form of sight, taste and form.”Unism Studio 

“The Levitating Theatre was conceived as an idea questioning the boundaries that currently lie between different expressions of Art in form of sight, taste and form,” according to the designers.

The manor in the village of Bronice-Kolonia, near Lublin, was built at the start of the 19th Century. After the Second World War, it was neglected for decades. In 2014, it returned to the Wolk-Laniewskis, the family that had owned it before the war, and regained its role as a cultural space.Lotek70

“The stage floats, like a Spaceship, that becomes for a moment, a Levitating Theatre holding the bridge, the conversation and the network between the Arts of this world,” they add.

A cross between an outdoor stage, dining table and sculpture, the installation seeks to challenge boundaries between performers and audiences.Unism Studio

Built for the Polish branch of the International Theatre Institute and the Association of Bronice Manor House, the project was sponsored by Naleczów Zdrój S.A., a water company named after the nearby spa town.