Łódź’s Karl Scheibler factory regains former splendour after stunning transformation

Architects say they wanted to recreate the original appearance of the power plant and preserve as many historical elements as possible. Press materials

The early 20th century power plant at the Scheibler Factory in Łódź has been given a stunning new facelift as part of investment in the city’s former industrial sites.

The city of Łódź in central Poland experienced a golden age as a textile manufacturing centre during the 19th and 20th Century. 

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The team referred to archival photos of the building during the renovation process, which provided guidance when it came to the architectural style and individual details such as the huge stained glass windows. Press materials

The city grew around big factories, including the one founded by industrialist Karl Scheibler.

Born in Prussia in 1820, Scheibler went on to be known as the “King of the Cotton and Linen Empires of Łódź”, reflecting his role in the city’s industrial city. 

Łódź experienced a golden age as a textile manufacturing centre during the 19th and 20th Century with Karl Schreiber’s factories leading the way. Public domain

After coming to the city in the mid-1800s, he founded a spinning mill and later expanded his production facilities. He died in Łódź in 1881.

Now the façade of the power plant in the former Scheibler factory has been renovated as part of Echo Investment’s FUZJA project in Łódź, which aims to create “multifunctional city quarter”.

Karl Scheibler became known as the “King of the Cotton and Linen Empires of Łódź”.Public domain

The power plant building was built in 1910, almost thirty years after Scheibler’s death, when he son Karl Scheibler junior decided to make the factories independent from external energy supplies. 

Designed by architect Alfred Frisch, who was born in what is now Latvia, it was secessionist in style. 

It was built out of reinforced concrete, one of the first buildings in Łódź constructed in this way.

The new glass composition set in the original frames – which includes shades of green, blue and golden yellow – invokes the historical design.Press materials

“We really wanted to recreate the original appearance of the power plant and preserve as many historical elements as possible,” said the Fuzja project’s director Anna Malarczyk-Arcidiacono.

The team referred to archival photos of the building during the renovation process, which provided guidance when it came to the architectural style and individual details such as the huge stained glass windows. 

The new glass composition set in the original frames – which includes shades of green, blue and golden yellow – invokes the historical design.

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In addition to historic buildings with space for services, shops and restaurants, and residential and office buildings, it will include public spaces and green areas spanning almost 4 hectares.Press materials

The façade renovation was designed by Toruń-based company RESTAURO, which specialises in building, painting and sculpture conservation. 

The renovation of the power plant walls was carried out by a consortium of the companies MODANTA and MAFORMA Miron Keller.

“We definitely want the power plant to be a place full of life. For it to please the eye and serve people who will spend their free time here,” Malarczyk-Arcidiacono added.