Locals turn out to save 60-year-old confectionary shop under threat from Lockdown II

The family-run business which ‘survived the terrible times of the People’s Republic of Poland’, was swamped with customers after it issued a heart-felt plea on social media. PAP/Rurki z Bitą Śmietaną Rondo Wiatraczna/Facebook

People in Warsaw have come forward to save a beloved shop selling cream-filled treats as it struggles to survive the coronavirus pandemic.

“Rurki ze śmietaną” is a Polish dessert made up of crisp wafers wound into tubes filled with whipped cream. They are often sold to-go and eaten directly on the street.

The heartfelt appeal prompted a big response, as people came forward to support the shop, with photos showing a long line of people queuing on the street outside, each awaiting their turn.Leszek Szymański/PAP

In Warsaw’s eastern Praga district, Rurki z Wiatraka has been selling them for over 60 years.

A family business, the shop gets its name from Rondo Wiatraczna in Warsaw, where it is located (“Wiatrak” means windmill in Polish).

“Rurki ze śmietaną” is a Polish dessert made up of crisp wafers wound into tubes filled with whipped cream.Leszek Szymański/PAP

Now, with the restrictions on cafes and restaurants in Poland due to the second wave of the coronavirus pandemic, the business has reached out to customers with a call for help.

“We survived the terrible times of the People’s Republic of Poland, you were with us when the political system changed, you emphasized that we were important to you,” Rurki z Wiatraka wrote in a post on its Facebook page on 5 November.

The shop gets its name from Rondo Wiatraczna in Warsaw, where it is located (“Wiatrak” means windmill in Polish).Leszek Szymański/PAP

“The ban on eating meals in the street stabbed us straight in the heart, and despite attempts to get out of the situation safely, further restrictions were added. Unfortunately, we are at risk of bankruptcy,” it added.

The heartfelt appeal prompted a big response, as people came forward to support the shop. Photos show a long line of people queuing on the street outside, each awaiting their turn.

In Warsaw’s eastern Praga district, Rurki z Wiatraka has been selling them for over 60 years.Rurki z Bitą Śmietaną Rondo Wiatraczna/Facebook

The rurki, which cost 3.50 złoty each, can be bought packed ready to take home and eat there, rather than on the street.Leszek Szymański/PAP

On Facebook, people shared their memories of the shop, which often go back decades.

“I was 2.5 years old when I started living in Grochów on Garwolińska Street. Since then (1967), I have eaten your delicious rurki. I live far away, but I remember them perfectly!” wrote a man called Dario under the shop’s appeal.


“I have been buying the rurki since 1966. During the break between lessons, I ran to get rurki, even when it was very cold. The rurki were always very tasty,” wrote a woman called Ula, under a different post.

The rurki, which cost 3.50 złoty each, can be bought packed ready to take home and eat there, rather than on the street. Payment is in cash only. The shop also sells waffles.