Kraków docs become first in Poland to use sci-fi style holograms to help with ops

The CarnaLife Holo system allows surgeons to create a holographic image that can be rotated and examined helping surgeons better plan and carry out operations. Press materials

A hospital in Kraków has become the first in Poland to use holograms when planning and performing surgeries on liver and pancreatic tumours.

The CarnaLife Holo system, developed by Kraków-based MedApp, allows surgeons to create a holographic image that can be rotated and examined.

The images give greater clarity than traditional medical imaging such as CT or MRI scans.Press materials

This will allow the surgeon to better plan how to remove the tumour before opening a patient up and during the procedure the surgeon will have a three-dimensional map of where to cut and what obstructions are present.

Dr. Ryszard Wierzbicki, Oncology surgeon at Szpital na Klinach said: “Thanks to this technology, I had in front of me holographic images of organs and tissues against the patient's background and I was able to interact with these images during the procedure.

The hospital will begin using the technology in surgeries involving all areas of oncology and gynaecology.Press materials

“The technology was also used to plan the operations in detail. It is very important in situations where the surgical approach to the neoplastic lesion is difficult due to its location.”

The CarnaLife Holo system, which works with Microsoft Hololens Mixed Reality Goggles, enables medical practitioners to visualize various types of anatomical structures such as organs, bone structures and blood vessels in mixed reality. The images give greater clarity than traditional medical imaging such as CT or MRI scans.

So far the surgeries have taken place on liver and pancreatic tumours but there are plans to use the technology more widely. Press materials

Andrzej Skalski, Director of Technology and Mixed Reality Development at MedApp, said: “The advantage of such a hologram is, in the first place to present a three-dimensional object, in this case the operated organ, in a three-dimensional world.

“This, in turn, makes it easier to understand the spatial relationships between structures and additionally enables the visualization of objects passing through given organs. CarnaLife Holo is especially applicable in cases where we are dealing with complex topologies of anatomical structures.

Dr. Ryszard Wierzbicki, Oncology surgeon at Szpital na Klinach said that the new technology was invaluable to his work as a surgeon.chroniezdrowie.pl

“Then it is crucial to understand the relationship between the depth at which they are located and how they are connected, especially when planning the trajectory of the tool in relation to the area to be operated on. The hologram allows you to do it in an intuitive way.”

So far the surgeries have taken place on liver and pancreatic tumours but there are plans to use the CarnaLife Holo technology more widely.

The hospital will begin using the technology in surgeries involving all areas of oncology and gynaecology.