'I’ve never seen anything like it’ says flabbergasted forester after stumbling across a-BOAR-able ‘Dalmatian piglets’

Jacek Boczar from the Opole Forest Inspectorate in southern Poland was gobsmacked to see the litter of black and white baby porkers snorting around on the ground in forests. Jacek Boczar/ Opole Forest Inspectorate

A forester was left dumbfounded after stumbling across this adorable litter of wild piglets resembling Dalmatian puppies.

Jacek Boczar from the Opole Forest Inspectorate in southern Poland had been going about his work in forests near the village of Tarnów Opolski when he heard some rustling sounds behind him.

Normally, wild boar are brown with dark stripes running down the length of their bodies, so running into a litter of black and white boar piglets is not so common.Jacek Boczar/ Opole Forest Inspectorate

Spinning round he was gobsmacked to see seven wild baby oinkers snorting around on the ground - with four of them coloured black and white.

The stunned forester told TFN: “It was truly remarkable not only to see three-week-old piglets but also to see white ones with black spots.

“They really looked like slightly fatter Dalmatian puppies.”

Capturing the extraordinary moment on video, Boczar followed the mother-less porkers as they trotted around the forest before heading up a woodland path.Jacek Boczar/ Opole Forest Inspectorate

He added that in his 15-year-long career this was the first time he had ‘ever seen anything like it’.

Capturing the extraordinary moment on video, Boczar followed the motherless porkers as they trotted around the forest before heading up a woodland path.

The ‘Dalmatian’ piglets were spotted in forests near the village of Tarnów Opolski.TFN

Normally, wild boar are brown with dark stripes running down the length of their bodies.

According to Poland’s Central Statistical Office (GUS), running into boar babies in the forest is not uncommon as there are at least 75,200 wild boars in the country.

But running into a litter of black and white boar piglets is not so common.

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Suggesting that the boar family may have been crossbred with domestic pigs, Boczar said: “If this is the case it’s better if boars and pigs don’t mix because it does not serve boars well, but it’s not as bad as the hybridisation of wolves and domestic dogs, for example.”

Wild boar expert, Dr. Tomasz Podgórski from the Mammal Research Institute of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Białowieża told broadcaster TVN24: “In fact, it is not known where the colour comes from.

Stunned Boczar told TFN: “It was truly remarkable not only to see three-week-old piglets but also to see white ones with black spots. They really looked like slightly fatter Dalmatian puppies.”Jacek Boczar/Facebook

“Sometimes they are observed in different places in Poland, but also in other countries in Europe.

“There can be two reasons for this in general. Either this is the result of hybridisation with pigs - in the past, in a given population, there may have been episodes of crossing with pigs slowly grazing in the forest - or it is simply a genetic mutation of coloration.”