Green means Clean: Stunning new art installation changes colour to indicate smog levels

The 14 kilometres of hand-woven colour-changing thread reacts to air pollution levels. Press Materials

A futuristic 400-square-metre art installation that changes colour with the level of air pollution has been set up in Warsaw to draw attention to the dangers of smog and some possible solutions to the airborne menace.

Installed in the shadow of the Palace of Culture the Zero Emission Store consists of a network of 14 kilometres of hand-woven colour-changing thread that reacts to air pollution levels. So if the smog is bad, it glows red, but if the air is clean it turns green.

Installed in the shadow of the Palace of Culture, if the smog is bad, it glows red, but if the air is clean it turns green.Press Materials

The installation is also powered by photovoltaic energy and so is emission free. The electricity comes from eight panels installed on the roof of the neighbouring Warszawa Śródmieście railway station, which take about five to eight hours to charge the installation’s batteries.

Smog has become something of a curse for the capital city during winter months with residents having to deal with high pollution levels that have left them searching for solutions.

The electricity comes from eight panels installed on the roof of the neighbouring Warszawa Śrómieście railway station, which take about five to eight hours to charge the installation’s batteries.Press Materials

Designed by artist Sławomir Brzoska and supported by the innogy Group, a European group specialising in renewable energy and electricity and gas infrastructure, the installation will glow away in central Warsaw until December 22.

“We wanted to create a structure that would draw the attention of pedestrians to the level of air pollution in the city,” said Anna Seemann, head of marketing at innogy Polska.

The installation was designed by artist Sławomir Brzoska who lectures at Poznań and Katowice’s academies of fine art and has been working with thread to create installations for 20 years.Tran 67/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license

“At the same time it highlights our store where we can tell people about our products and how to support producers of renewable energy,” she added.

Brzoska, who lectures at Poznań and Katowice’s academies of fine art, has been working with thread to create installations for 20 years.

The installation has been supported by the innogy Group, a European group specialising in renewable energy and electricity and gas infrastructure.Press Materials

He has had around 180 exhibitions of his work spread across Poland and a diverse group of countries ranging from Wales to Japan.

Once the installation has finished the thread will be transformed into bedding material for an animal shelter.