Go on, girls! Warsaw company’s solar panel innovation could soon be CELLING like hot cakes

Co-founder and CTO at Saule Technologies Olga Malinkiewicz (L) and Katarzyna Zawodna, CEO of Skanska’s commercial development business in CEE, with one of the perovskite solar modules used to cover Warsaw’s Spark Skyscraper. Saule Technologies

A Polish company is revolutionizing the solar panels industry with its use of unique perovskite cells.

Saule Technologies from Warsaw is replacing silicon to create energy self-sufficient buildings using the compound known as Perovskite, a calcium titanium oxide mineral composed of calcium titanate.

In December, Saule Technologies’ solar modules were installed at the Henn na Hotel in Japan. 

Staffed entirely by robots, this construction is one of the most technologically advanced in the world. 

Saule Technologies and Skanska teamed up to covere the Spark skyscraper with 52 photovoltaic (generating electricity from sunlight) modules. Kalbar/TFN

In Warsaw, together with Skanska, a multinational construction and development company, they covered the Spark skyscraper with 52 photovoltaic (generating electricity from sunlight) modules. 

After the test phase, the final product should be able to power up the light source for a single workplace for at least eight hours. 

Konrad Wojciechowski, Saule Technologies’ science director and project manager told PAP: “Perovskite photovoltaic modules are manufactured using advanced inkjet technology. The finished device is then integrated with double glazing or a façade through a standard lamination process used in the construction industry.”

What makes the perovskite panels so innovative, is the wide range of applications they offer. Thinner, more flexible, light-weight, semi-transparent and more efficient than the more common silicon solar panels, they can be bent, dyed and seamlessly installed into buildings. Saule Technologies

What makes the perovskite panels so innovative, is the wide range of applications they offer. Thinner, more flexible, light-weight, semi-transparent and more efficient than the more common silicon solar panels, they can be bent, dyed and seamlessly installed into buildings. 

The perovskite mineral is just as efficient as other materials and captures sun rays even when the angle on which they fall is not optimal, leading to zero-energy and carbon neutral solutions for construction work.

The perovskite mineral is just as efficient as other materials and captures sun rays even when the angle on which they fall is not optimal, leading to zero-energy and carbon neutral solutions for construction work.Kalbar/TFN

With the growing demand for green energy and smart city solutions, perovskite panels are proving to be the answer.

With tests underway, Saule Technologies are working on the commercialization of their panels  and mass production with the hope of widespread use. 

"The first pilot factory is set to launch at the end of 2019, which will enable the production of large perovskite solar modules in an industrial manner, while at the same time working on optimizing the process to improve the operational parameters of the devices," Wojciechowski said.