Gas what! Baltic pipe from Denmark to Poland given the go-ahead

The project, which will see 10 billion cubic meters of natural gas flowing to Poland annually and 3 billion cubic meters of raw material from Poland to Denmark, has strategic importance in ensuring the diversification of energy sources for Poland. Leszek Szymański/PAP

Denmark has approved the construction of a Baltic Pipe in its waters, moving forward plans to bring Norwegian gas to Poland.

The project, implemented by the Danish Energinet and Polish Gaz-System, has strategic importance in ensuring the diversification of energy sources for Poland.

Construction works on the Baltic Pipe are scheduled to begin in 2020 and finish by 2022.

The gas pipeline will be able to transport 10 billion cubic meters of natural gas annually to Poland and 3 billion cubic meters of raw material from Poland to Denmark.

The pipeline project runs from Europipe II in the Danish part of the North Sea, across Denmark, among others through Little Belt, through the Danish, Swedish and Polish parts of the Baltic Sea, to Niechorze or Rogowo in Poland.Danish Energy Agency

The Danish Energy Agency released a statement, in which they pointed out the reasons behind their decision: “The Baltic Pipe is expected to contribute to Poland’s transition from coal to natural gas, which will reduce the greenhouse gas emissions.

“In addition, Baltic Pipe is considered to increase the security of gas supply in Denmark because a direct access for the Danish gas system to the Norwegian upstream pipeline, Europipe II is established.”

The pipeline project runs from Europipe II in the Danish part of the North Sea, across Denmark, among others through Little Belt, through the Danish, Swedish and Polish parts of the Baltic Sea, to Niechorze or Rogowo in Poland.

Piotr Naimski, Polish Secretary of State responsible for the strategic energy infrastructure said: “This is very good news. It means that Gaz-System will be able to fully implement this investment in Danish waters, both territorial and in the exclusive economic zone.Tytus Żmijewski/PAP

The total length of the pipeline route is projected to approx. 850 km, of which approx. 105 km of the route is in Danish waters in the North Sea and four km in Danish waters in the Little Belt and 133 km in the Baltic Sea.

Piotr Naimski, Polish Secretary of State responsible for the strategic energy infrastructure said: “This is very good news. It means that Gaz-System will be able to fully implement this investment in Danish waters, both territorial and in the exclusive economic zone.

"It can be said that the investment is being implemented as planned."

The companies still need similar decisions from Swedish and Polish authorities, which according to Naimski will be made soon and the Baltic Pipeline’s implantation timeline isn’t threatened.

At the same time, Denmark is yet to give permission for the Russian Nord Stream II pipe to be laid on their territory, as the only country through which Gazprom is building their pipeline.

The Danish Energy Agency released a statement, in which they pointed out the reasons behind their decision: “The Baltic Pipe is expected to contribute to Poland’s transition from coal to natural gas, which will reduce the greenhouse gas emissions. Leszek Szymański/PAP

While there are alternatives bypassing the Danish waters, they are financially unfeasible.

The permission given to the Polish project is not without its conditions though.

The project has to be: “constructed and operated without unacceptable impact on the environment and safety.” 

As long as Gaz-System and Energinet comply with the measures they presented in the construction proposal, they should be allowed to implement it.

To read more about the project click here.