EU announces massive investment in underwater electricity cable between Poland and Lithuania

On 1 October, member states approved a European Commission proposal to invest almost 1 billion euros in ten energy infrastructure projects, as part of the EU’s Connecting Europe Facility. ARIS OIKONOMOU/POOL/PAP/EPA

An electricity cable linking Poland and Lithuania through the Baltic Sea will receive a massive injection of funds from the EU, as part of efforts to improve energy infrastructure in Europe.

In addition to its economic importance, energy infrastructure is also significant from a security perspective. More developed energy infrastructure can help make EU member states less dependent on energy supplies from other countries, such as Russia.

The new funding will go towards building the Harmony Link, an underwater electricity cable between Poland and Lithuania.INEA

The EU is investing in these improvements: on 1 October, member states approved a European Commission proposal to invest almost 1 billion euros in ten energy infrastructure projects, as part of the EU’s Connecting Europe Facility.

Of the 998 million euros allocated, the largest amount go towards a project integrating the electricity systems of Poland with those of the three Baltic States to its north: Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia. Overall, the Baltic Synchronisation Project will receive a massive 720 million euros, far more than any other project in this round of funding.

EU Commissioner for Energy Kadri Simson said the project “will contribute to a more modern, secure and smart energy infrastructure”. JOHN THYS/POOL/PAP/EPA

The new funding will go towards building the Harmony Link, an underwater electricity cable between Poland and its north-eastern neighbour, Lithuania. The cable will support the development of energy infrastructure in the region, becoming a building block for an offshore grid in the Baltic Sea.

According to EU Commissioner for Energy Kadri Simson, the ten projects “will contribute to a more modern, secure and smart energy infrastructure”. 

In addition to its economic importance, energy infrastructure is also significant from a security perspective. More developed energy infrastructure can help make EU member states less dependent on energy supplies from other countries, such as Russia.MICHAEL KLIMENTYEV/SPUTNIK/KREMLIN POOL/PAP/EPA

“Yesterday's decision marks a decisive step in the Baltic Synchronisation process in particular, a project of European strategic interest. These investments will help sustain the EU's economic recovery and create jobs,” she stated on 2 October.

The other projects selected include the Danube Ingrid, a smart electricity grid project in Hungary and the Slovak Republic, one of Poland’s southern neighbours. The project, which will receive 102 million euros, will improve network management and increase the quality and security of supply.