Designer’s stunning chandeliers inspired by Nobel prize winning Marie Curie

The chandeliers called Maria S.C. are inspired by scientist Marie Skłodowska-Curie. Pani Jurek

A Warsaw-based designer has created a series of stunning test tube chandeliers inspired by scientist Marie Skłodowska-Curie.

The set called Maria S.C. by Magda Jurek, who works under the name Pani Jurek, consist of either one or two rings of test tubes, depending on the model chosen, which are mounted in plywood bands.

The single-level chandelier is made out of 60 test tubes and has a diameter of 47 cm.Pani Jurek

The single-level chandelier is made out of 60 test tubes and has a diameter of 47 cm. The double one, which has two levels, is made out of 100 test tubes.

The double chandelier, which has two levels, is made out of 100 test tubes.Pani Jurek

According to Pani Jurek, “this surprising material and geometric shape makes this lamp both classic and innovative. The double glass cylinder recalls Art Deco forms in a unique contemporary way.”

The chandelier’s simple materials make it easy to personalise – for example, with flower arrangements inside the test tubes, which act like dozens of tiny vases suspended from the ceiling.

Pani Jurek

Pani Jurek

Pani Jurek

One customer, posting under the name Kristen Eber, shared a photo of the chandelier that she had bought, the upper ring of test tubes filled with sprigs of dried lavender.

The stunning chandeliers are the creation of Magda Jurek, who works under the name Pani Jurek.Pani Jurek

She wrote: “This chandelier is the centerpiece of my spa’s reception area. It is STUNNING. The clients love it and so do I. We love changing the look of it with various flowers and herbs.”

Born in Warsaw in 1867, Marie Skłodowska-Curie  spent her career in Paris conducting pioneering research on radioactivity with her husband, French physicist Pierre Curie.

Marie Skłodowska-Curie  spent her career in Paris conducting pioneering research on radioactivity with her husband, French physicist Pierre Curie.Public domain

For her work, she was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1903 and the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1911.