CJEU ruling on judicial retirement concerns the past - Polish PM

According to Morawiecki, the Polish judicial system "still requires very profound reforms." Paweł Supernak/PAP

Tuesday's ruling by the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) on Poland's reform of the retirement age of judges and public prosecutors concerns a historical state of affairs, Polish PM Mateusz Morawiecki has said in a conversation with PAP.

The CJEU ruled on Tuesday that Polish laws relating to the retirement age of judges and public prosecutors, adopted in July 2017, are contrary to EU law.

"Basically, the ruling concerns a historical state of affairs since the relevant law was amended more than a year ago. We'll scrutinise the ruling and its potential consequences," the prime minister told PAP.

According to Morawiecki, the Polish judicial system "still requires very profound reforms." "And we will continue these reforms in a way that is understandable for our partners in the European Union, and first of all so that our courts should finally start to operate efficiently as this is what our citizens strongly expect," he said.

In Tuesday’s judgment, the Court upheld the action for failure to fulfil obligations brought by the European Commission against Poland and held that as a member state it had failed to fulfil its obligations under EU law, first, by establishing a different retirement age for men and women who were judges or public prosecutors in Poland and, second, by lowering the retirement age of judges of common courts while conferring on the Minister for Justice the power to extend the period of active service of those judges.

The reforms had lowered the age of retirement for women to 60 and for men to 65 from the previous 67 years for both sexes. Since 2017, Poland has changed the regulations in question.