Changes to justice system continue work 'interrupted' four years ago

On Monday, Zbigniew Ziobro announced a series of changes to the structure of Polish justice, including a "levelling" of the court system. Rafał Guz/PAP

Changes to the judiciary planned by the justice minister are part of a “reform” process that was interrupted four years ago.

On Monday, Zbigniew Ziobro announced a series of changes to the structure of Polish justice, including a "levelling" of the court system.

In an interview for Polish Radio, Ziobro said that the changes concerned "the activation of reforms which were interrupted four years ago."

He pointed out that "in 2017, the president (Andrzej Duda – PAP) decided to issue a veto which blocked a bill prepared by the Ministry of Justice regarding the Supreme Court and the National Council of the Judiciary."

"And he prepared his own bills which, today, are the subject of dispute and are being questioned by EU institutions," Ziobro said.

He added that the president's legislation was "intended to be a compromise towards the EU, but as it turns out, the EU does not recognise any compromises."

At the time, the government tried to reach an agreement with the EU, and a decision was taken that the reforms would not be continued after 2017, until a compromise could be worked out, Ziobro said.

He added the planned legislation had "been waiting for four years, and the time has come to carry out the reforms, which were promised to Poles," mentioning that the reforms would bring "enormous benefits."