Auschwitz Museum offers virtual lesson about Litzmannstadt Ghetto

The Litzmannstadt Ghetto, established in February 1940 and destroyed in August 1944, was the second-largest ghetto in German-occupied Europe after the Warsaw Ghetto. Public domain

An online lesson presenting the fate of Jews held in the Litzmannstadt Ghetto, set up in the Nazi German-occupied central Polish city of Łódź during World War II, was posted on the Auschwitz Museum's website on Monday.

The lesson is available in Polish, English and Hebrew.

The Litzmannstadt (German for Łódź - PAP) Ghetto, established in February 1940 and destroyed in August 1944, was the second-largest ghetto in German-occupied Europe after the Warsaw Ghetto, with a total of 230,000 people held there. It was also the longest operating Jewish ghetto in occupied Poland during World War II.

A large percentage of the inmates were Jewish intellectuals from Poland, Czechoslovakia, Germany, Austria and Luxembourg. Many of them were later killed in Auschwitz.

According to various sources, no more than 7,000 to 13,000 residents of the ghetto survived the war.

The Nazi Germans established the Auschwitz camp in 1940, initially for the imprisonment of Poles. Auschwitz II-Birkenau was established two years later and became the main site for the mass extermination of Jews. There was also a network of sub-camps in the complex. The Germans killed at least 1.1 million people at Auschwitz, mainly Jews, but also Poles, Roma and Soviet prisoners of war.

The camp was liberated by the Red Army on January 27, 1945. In 1947, the camp site was declared a national memorial site.