Auschwitz a symbol of inhumanity - Polish Sejm speaker

"Auschwitz-Birkenau is a symbol of inhumanity, of trampling the values which are close to a human being. It sevres as a reminder to current and future generations so that the time of extermination be never repeated," the Polish lower house speaker wrote on Thursday.

"The Nazi ideology was based on hatred, contempt of other human beings and a will to conquer the world," Sejm Speaker Marek Kuchciński, wrote on Twitter on the National Day of Remembrance of Nazi Concentration Camps Victims.

"It is important for the remembrance of the victims of Nazi German annihilation to never be erased from human hearts and minds," Kuchciński stressed.

In 2006, Poland's parliament declared June 14 the National Day of Remembrance of Nazi Concentration Camps Victims to mark the first transport of 728 Polish political prisoners from the prison in Tarnów to the newly built Auschwitz concentration camp in 1940. This date is considered to be the day when the camp began operating.

A mass in Harmęże (southern Poland) on Thursday morning inaugurated commemorations marking the National Day of Remembrance of Nazi Concentration Camps Victims.

Later in the day, Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki will take part in observances marking the National Day of Remembrance of Nazi Concentration Camps Victims at the Pawiak Prison Museum in Warsaw. Observances are also planned in the former Nazi German death camp Auschwitz-Birkenau.

The Germans established the Auschwitz camp in 1940, initially for the imprisonment of Poles. Auschwitz II-Birkenau was established two years later. It became the site for the mass extermination of Jews. There was also a network of sub-camps in the complex. The Germans killed at least 1.1 million people at Auschwitz, including about 960,000 people of Jewish descent.

The camp was liberated by the Red Army on January 27, 1945. In 1947, the camp was declared a national memorial site.