Anti-violence act brings more protection for women - minister

Commenting on the new law at a press conference, Justice Minister Zbigniew Ziobro said it will raise legal protection for victims of domestic violence. Radek Pietruszka/PAP

A Monday-introduced anti-violence act introduces new protection measures for victims of domestic violence, including the expulsion of perpetrators from common households. Perpetrators will also be issued restraining orders banning them from close contacts with victims.

Commenting on the new law at a press conference, Justice Minister Zbigniew Ziobro said it will raise legal protection for victims of domestic violence. Ziobro said that the new regulations were based on similar solutions in Europe and were a "milestone" in securing adequate protection for victims.

He added that the law's passage showed that Poland's United Right government was prepared to take prompt and strict measures against domestic violence perpetrators.

"Many words have been said about domestic violence, many promises have been made. We, the United Right government, do not limit ourselves to words, but act," Ziobro said.

Ziobro said the new regulations foresaw immediate action against perpetrators instead of the protracted proceedings under to-date laws.

"The idea is for people under one roof with a tyrant to know that when they lodge a complaint, steps against the aggressor will be undertaken immediately, that this will not drag on for months or years as was the case until now, and that the perpetrator will be removed from the household within hours," Ziobro said.

Under the new laws domestic perpetrators found to constitute a threat to the lives or health of other household members will be immediately removed from the household and be subject to a restraining order.

According to police figures up to 250,000 people in Poland may be affected by domestic violence.