Adventurer makes 700 km solo trek across Iceland in subzero temperatures

For Łukasz Supergan, crossing Iceland once on foot was not enough – he wanted to do it in winter, too. Łukasz Supergan/Facebook

A Polish adventurer is crossing Iceland alone this winter, braving tough terrain and freezing high winds.

Łukasz Supergan has a passion for mountains and solitary expeditions.

In 2004, he set out to hike the arch of the Carpathian Mountains that passes through several countries in Central Europe, becoming the first person to do so alone.

Lugging a 50kg sledge being him, Łukasz is making the 694km trek on skis. Łukasz Supergan/Facebook

Since then, he has walked 20,000 km on three continents, crossing difficult terrain ranging from the Alps to the Himalayas.

His accounts of his hikes through the Carpathians and the Zagros Mountains of Iran were published as books in Polish.

Now Supergan has set himself a new challenge: to cross Iceland in winter.

Iceland has been crossed a few times in winter, but only twice between the eastern to the western coast, and never solo.Łukasz Supergan/Facebook

On 27 January, he set off from the Dalatangi Cape, on the country’s eastern coast.

His aim is to reach the Snæfellsnes Peninsula on the other side of the island, which he expects will take him 5-6 weeks in total. The timing will depend on the weather, he admits.

Łukasz is hoping that the 694km trek from the Dalatangi Cape to the Snæfellsnes Peninsula will take him 5-6 weeks in total. Google maps

This is not the first time he is crossing Iceland: he walked across the island from west to east – a route of 935 km – in July and August 2016. The major difference was that it was summer then.

“Already then I knew that I would like to cross Iceland on foot and alone in winter,” he writes on his website.

This time, he is travelling on skis rather than walking, pulling a 50-kg sledge with equipment and supplies.

Łukasz has already walked 20,000 km on three continents, crossing difficult terrain ranging from the Alps to the Himalayas. Łukasz Supergan/Facebook

Iceland has been crossed a few times in winter, but only twice between the eastern to the western coast, and never solo, he highlights.

Signals sent by satellite messenger allow the public to follow Supergan’s progress on a map on his website, which is updated at least one a day.

The adventurer is posting updates of his journey on social media, with comments about his progress, challenges he encounters and stunning photos of Iceland’s wild winter landscape.łukasz Supergan/Facebook

He is also posting updates of his journey on social media, with comments about his progress, challenges he encounters and stunning photos of Iceland’s wild winter landscape.

“3 km to the volcano took me hellish 2 hours. The last meters I was marching in rubber boots operating the sled like it was a boat. The variability of conditions is the essence of this place,” he wrote on in his post on Facebook on 7 February.

He set off from the Dalatangi Cape, on the country’s eastern coast, on January 27th. Łukasz Supergan/Facebook

“First inhabitants that I’ve met after more than 2 weeks in the Icelandic highlands. Horses live on pastures all year round and are extremely resistant to the winter frost,” he wrote on 18 February, beside a photo of brown and white horses standing in the snow.

In addition to outlines of his expeditions, Supergan reviews equipment and shares tips on how to travel in tough conditions on the blog on his website.